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22 Aug 2019

Kieran’s Our City, Our Town, 22 August 2019

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1011a. Tinted postcard of the unfinished St Colmans Cathedral, Queenstown, c.1900

 

 

Kieran’s Our City, Our Town Article,

Cork Independent, 22 August 2019

Tales from 1919: The Consecration of St Colman’s Cathedral

 

    One hundred years ago this week on 24 August 1919 impressive ceremonies took place at Queenstown (now Cobh) to consecrate St Colman’s Cathedral. Local newspapers such as the Cork Examiner covered the event and the cathedral history was well documented in their August 1919 spread. Since then many historians, locally and internationally, have written on the gorgeous building.

   The building of a Cathedral in Queenstown was the-conception of Dr William Keane, Bishop of Cloyne from 1857 to January 1874. He had personal knowledge of the grand Gothic Cathedrals of France, where he had lived for the greater part of his life as student and Superior in the Irish College, Paris. About the year 1860 Bishop Keane appealed to the people of the parish of Queenstown to inaugurate a fund for the purpose of meeting the initial expenditure on his great project. Within ten years the Queenstown fund reached the large figure of £15,000.

   The Cathedral is one of Edward W Pugin and George Ashlin’s most important Irish commissions. It is one of the finest examples of ecclesiastical architecture in the Gothic revival style in Ireland. It was built at a time when leading architects had absorbed the principles of pointed architecture laid down by A W N Pugin (1812-1852), the father of E W Pugin and father-in-law of George Ashlin.

   When groundwork began preparing for the building of the Cathedral, the old church or the chapel of Queenstown was taken down to provide a site for the Cathedral itself. The building used as the Queenstown Intermediate School, run by the Presentation Brothers, was erected to serve as a temporary parochial church. The costliest part of the preliminary works was in connection with the laying of the foundations, which had to be built up from a depth of 24 feet. The outlay on these preliminary works amounted to more than half the £15,000 already subscribed from Queenstown.

   On 30 September 1868, Bishop Keane laid the cornerstone of the Cathedral. By January 1874 the month of Bishop Keane’s death. the outer walls of the Cathedral had been raised all round to the height of 14 or 15 feet. The outlay amounted to £20,486 4s 8d, representing £8,000 spent on the preliminary works and £12,460 paid to the contractors.

   In September 1874, Bishop John MacCarthy was consecrated Bishop of Cloyne in succession to Bishop Keane and took up the work. The external walls all round were raised to their full height; the magnificent roof of best Belgian slate, with its stone-cut water-valleys and numerous statues, were constructed. The tower, which stood when he took it in hands, only about 15 feet high, was raised by a storey. The crypt was constructed as well as the beautiful west front. Dalkey blue Granite and Mallow limestone were used in the external walls. The building contractors employed in the vast project comprised local quarrymen, car men, labourers, limestone and bath stone masons, sawyers, nailers, carpenters, smiths, plumbers, tradesmen’s helpers and numerous general stone masons.

   Notable additions were also made in the interior such as the high altar, side-chapels within the sanctuary. The tiled mosaic floor of the chancel was tiled. The bishop’s throne, the beautiful south transept stained-glass window, and the marble Communion railing were installed. On 15 June 1879, the first Mass was celebrated.

   In his Pastoral Letter of 1891-2, Bishop MacCarthy whilst making an appeal to the diocese for help, highlighted that the outlay on the Cathedral from its inception till then was over £100,000. He had received £8,000 from an appeal in 1882 to the diocese. He got £15,000 from the priests of his diocese, £50,000 from the generous laity of his diocese, £14,000 from Irishmen in the United States and Australia, £7,000 from dioceses in Ireland other than Cloyne, £8,600 from legacies and special donations, and to these sums.

   Following the example set by Bishop MacCarthy, his successor, Bishop Robert Browne, took up the work which Bishop McCarthy had left off. Right in front of the great western door stood the town bridewell and two very dilapidated houses, which he detailed should be taken down. Moreover, the space round the Cathedral was very narrow and unsuitable. A great bastion wall was created from the bottom of the nearby ravine, some 30 or more feet deep. A sacristy and Cathedral Hall were constructed as well as the Chapel of the Blessed Thaddeus. This work would cost over £8,000. The tower was unfinished, and it had no spire. The tower and spire became the highest in Ireland and were furnished with a peal of 42 bells. All in all the work on the Cathedral took a full 50 years to complete.

   The beautiful interior boasts different forms of marble. Fermoy red marble is used in nave columns which rest on Italian white marble. Midleton red marble is used in the shrines and in the first confessionals of both aisles. Connemara green marble is used in the sanctuary pillars. Kilkenny black marble is engaged in columns at the end of the north aisle. Italian white marble is used in communion rails and altar tables. Caen (Brittany) Stone is used in Stations of Cross. Californian Pitch pine is used in the ceiling of the nave and in seating. Austrian Oak is used in screens, the Bishop’s throne, the canons’ stalls and the pulpit.

Kieran’s Upcoming Historical Walking Tours:

Thursday 22 August 2019, The Lough and its Curiosities; meet at green area at northern green of The Lough, entrance of Lough Road to The Lough; 6.45pm (free, two hours)

Friday 23 August 2019, Douglas and its History, in association with Douglas Tidy Towns; meet in the carpark of Douglas Community Centre, 6.45pm (free, two hours).

Saturday 24 August 2019, Park Stories, explore the history of Cork’s Mardyke; meet at band stand in park, opposite Cork City Museum in Fitzgerald’s Park, 11am (free, two hours).

Captions:

1011a. Tinted postcard of the unfinished St Colman’s Cathedral, Queenstown, c.1900 (source: Cork City Museum).

1011b. Present day picture from the waterfront of the front of St Colman’s Cathedral, Cobh (picture: Kieran McCarthy).

 

1011b. Present day picture from the waterfront of the front of St Colman’s Cathedral, Cobh

21 Aug 2019

Cllr McCarthy: Practical Projects must be core of Climate Change Adaptation Strategy

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Press Release:

   Independent Cllr Kieran McCarthy has highlighted that Cork City Council’s Climate Change Adaptation Strategy must embrace practical projects and that there is a large role to play for communities in Cork in the achievement of any proposals. The recently published draft strategy aims to ensure a proper comprehension of the key risks and vulnerabilities of climate change and bring forward the implementation of climate resilient actions in a planned and proactive manner. It also aims to ensure that climate adaptation considerations are mainstreamed into all operations and functions of Cork City Council.

   Cllr Kieran McCarthy noted: “At the initial debate between officials and councillors on the draft plan I articulated that practical climate adaptation community projects have a large part to play in achieving success for the proposal. For example, developing public parks and greening the city more can be achieved without an enormous amount of financial investment.

   In addition, a climate change adaptation strategy should also help the council to connect the relative global Sustainable Development Goals as well as re-applying for the European Green Capital programme, which was one of my five strands in my recent local election manifesto. There are also plenty best practice climate change adaptation projects to draw upon in other cities in Atlantic Europe and several successful EU urban initiatives that can be viewed on the insightful EU URBACT, EU Interreg and within the EU’s Horizon’s 2020 programmes. I am also delighted that Cork City Council will engage with schools and our youth as part of this consultation process”.

  A copy of the draft strategy may be inspected during the period from Tuesday 30 July 2019 to Friday 13 September 2019 (both dates inclusive) during normal business hours at Cork City Council, City Hall, Cork. The draft strategy is also available for inspection at all Council Public Libraries. The adaptation strategy may also be viewed on the Government Public Consultations Portal at www.corkcity.ie.

  Submissions or observations Cork City Council’s Draft Climate Adaptation Strategy may be made by e-mail to climateaction@corkcity.ie or via the online submission Portal on consult.corkcity.ie or in writing to Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, Strategic & Economic Development, Cork City Council, Cork City Hall.

21 Aug 2019

Site Watch: Glenanaar, Boreenmanna Road, 21 August 2019

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Despite large scale local concern planning permission has been granted for a controversial, 26-dwelling apartment complex on the site of the former Glenanaar pub on the Boreenmanna Road.

https://www.echolive.ie/corknews/Planning-permission-is-granted-for-a-controversial-car-free-apartment-block-on-the-site-of-the-former-Glenanaar-Bar-6ab22440-249c-4605-96a5-ca5c1e86c52d-ds

14 Aug 2019

Cork Heritage Open Day Looms

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    Cllr Kieran McCarthy will take part in Cork Heritage Open Day on Saturday 17 August through giving a tour of Cork City Hall. The open day is a unique event, which is held on the first Saturday of National Heritage Week. Cork Heritage Open Day will see over 42 buildings open their doors to the public for one day only.  A series of guided walking tours, heritage events, exhibitions, talks and children’s events will also take place.  All events are free.

   Cork Heritage Open Day is organised by Cork City Council as part of Heritage Week in partnership with the National Heritage Council and with media sponsorship from Cork’s 96FM and The Echo.

   A tour of City Hall by Cllr Kieran McCarthy will take place at 11am, which will include the architecture and history of the building and finishing with a visit to the Lord Mayor’s Chamber. This event is one of several building tours to be held on the 17 August. They are all free but some tours of buildings are ticketed. Please see www.corkheritageopenday.ie for more information or pick up a Cork Heritage Open Day brochure from the City’s libraries.

   Cllr McCarthy noted; “City Hall is one of the most splendid and historic buildings of Cork. The current structure, replaced the old City Hall, which was destroyed in the ‘The burning of Cork’ in 1920. It was designed by Architects Jones and Kelly and built by Cork Company Sisks”. The foundation stone was laid by Eamonn de Valera, president of the Executive Council of the State on 9 July, 1932. The first meeting of the Council was held on 24 April, 1935 and the building was formerly opened by Eamonn de Valera on 8th September 1936. 

   Kieran has also posted his walking tours for National Heritage Week, 17-24 August online on his website under the “tours” section at www.kieranmccarthy.ie.

14 Aug 2019

Kieran’s Our City, Our Town, 15 August 2019

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1010a. Church Street, Shandon, during the recent Shandon Street Festival, 2019, one of the themes on Kieran's upcoming walking tours for National Heritage Week

Kieran’s Our City, Our Town Article,

Cork Independent, 15 August 2019

Kieran’s Heritage Week Tours, 17-24 August 2019

   National Heritage Week is upon us again next week (19 – 26 August). It is going to be a busy week. For my part I have organised seven tours. These are all free and I welcome any public support for the activities outlined below. There are also brochures detailing other events that can be picked up from Cork City Hall and City libraries. If you are up the country on holidays, check out www.heritageweek.ie for the listings of national events.

 

Saturday 17 August 2019 – Historical Walking Tour of Cork City Hall with Kieran, 11am, ticketed (free, duration: 75 minutes; details at www.corkheritageopenday.ie)

Learn about the early history of Cork City Hall and Cork City Council; learn about the development of the building and visit the Lord Mayor’s Room. The current structure replaced the old City Hall, which was destroyed in the ‘burning of Cork’ in 1920. It was designed by Architects Jones and Kelly and built by the Cork Company Sisks. The foundation stone was laid by Eamon de Valera, President of the Executive Council of the State on 9 July 1932.

Sunday, 18 August 2019, Cork Through the Ages, An Introduction to the Historical Development of Cork City with Kieran; meet at the National Monument, Grand Parade, 6.45pm (free, duration: two hours)

Cork City city possesses a unique character derived from a combination of its plan, topography, built fabric and its location on the lowest crossing point of the river Lee as it meets the tidal estuary and the second largest natural harbour in the world. Indeed, it is also a city that is unique among other cities, it is the only one which has experienced all phases of Irish urban development, from circa 600AD to the present day. This tour explores the city’s earliest historical phases.

Monday 19 August 2018, Shandon Historical Walking Tour with Kieran; explore Cork’s most historic quarter; meet at North Gate Bridge, Shandon Street, 6.45pm (free, duration: two hours).

Tradition is one way to sum up the uniqueness of Shandon Street. Despite being a physical street, one can stroll down (or clamber up), the thoroughfare holds a special place in the hearts of many Corkonians.  The legacy of by-gone days is rich. The street was established by the Anglo-Normans as a thoroughfare to give access to North Gate Drawbridge and was originally known as Mallow Lane. Shandon Street locals identify with the special old qualities of the street. Different architectural styles reflect not only the street’s long history but also Cork’s past.

Tuesday 20 August 2019, The Victorian Quarter; historical walking tour with Kieran of the area around St Patrick’s Hill – Wellington Road and McCurtain Street; meet on the Green at Audley Place, top of St Patrick’s Hill, 6.45pm (free, duration: two hours)

This is a tour that brings the participant from the top of St Patrick’s Hill to the eastern end of McCurtain Street through Wellington Road. The tour will speak about the development of the Victorian Quarter and its hidden and beautiful architectural heritage. All are welcome and any old pictures and documents that people have of these areas, please bring along.

Thursday 22 August 2019, The Lough and its Curiosities; historical walking tour with Kieran; meet at green area at northern green of The Lough, entrance of Lough Road to The Lough; 6.45pm (free, duration: two hours)

This new walking tour circles the Lough and explores the area’s origins and histories. In such a corner of the city, stories abound ranging from duels, ice-skating, market gardening, Victorian nurseries and legend making as well as housing and church sites.

Friday 23 August 2019, Douglas and its History, historical walking tour with Kieran in association with Douglas Tidy Towns; Discover the history of industry and the development of this historic village, meet in the carpark of Douglas Community Centre, 6.45pm (free, duration: two hours, circuit of village, finishes nearby).

The story of Douglas and its environs is in essence a story of experimentation, of industry and of people and social improvement; the story of one of Ireland largest sailcloth factories is a worthwhile topic to explore in terms of its aspiration in its day in the eighteenth century;  that coupled with the creation of 40 or so seats or mansions and demesnes made it a place where the city’s merchants made their home it and also  a an interesting place to study in terms of ambition shown in the landscapes that were created and which still linger in the surrounding landscapes of Douglas Village.

Saturday 24 August 2019, Fitzgerald’s Park: The People’s Park; historical walking tour with Kieran, meet at band stand (opp. Museum), 11am, note the morning time (free, duration: two hours)

Looking at the physical landscape of the Park, there are clues to a forgotten and not so familiar past. The entrance pillars on the Mardyke, the Lord Mayor’s Pavilion, the museum, the fountain in the middle of the central pond dedicated to Fr Mathew and timber posts eroding in the river were once parts of one of Cork’s greatest historical events, the Cork International Exhibitions of 1902 and 1903. Just like the magical spell of Fitzgerald’s Park, the Mardyke exhibitions were spaces of power. Revered, imagined and real spaces were created. They were marketing strategies where the past, present and future merged. The entire event was the mastermind of Cork Lord Mayor Edward Fitzgerald, after which the park got it name.

 

Captions:

1010a. Church Street, Shandon, during the recent Shandon Street Festival, 2019, one of the themes on Kieran’s upcoming walking tours for National Heritage Week.

1010b. The Lough Nurseries operated by the Hartland family, c.1867, one of the themes on Kieran’s upcoming walking tours for National Heritage Week.

1010b. The Lough Nurseries operated by the Hartland family, c.1867, one of the themes on Kieran's upcoming walking tours for National Heritage Week

12 Aug 2019

Cllr McCarthy Announces his National Heritage Week Walking Tours

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    Douglas Road and Independent Cllr Kieran McCarthy has organised seven free historical walking tours for the upcoming National Heritage Week. The focus in the southern suburbs is on Douglas village and that of The Lough whilst in the northern suburbs. Shandon and the area of St Patrick’s Hill to MacCurtain Street will be focussed on. City Hall, Fitzgerald’s Park and the story of the Mardyke also feature. Cllr McCarthy noted; “these suburbs and sites possess really rich local histories from the early origins of Cork to historic views, big mansions, from Corporation social housing to philanthropic dwelling companies to buildings that define a district. There are hours and hours of exploration to be had from such sites; all add to the historical DNA, feel and sense of identity of these Cork suburbs”. The tours are listed below and all are free.

Saturday 17 August 2019 – A Tour of Cork City Hall, 11am, ticketed (free, part of Cork Heritage Open Day; details at www.corkheritageopenday.ie)

Sunday 18 August 2019, Cork Through the Ages; meet at the National Monument, Grand Parade, 6.45pm (free, two hours).

Monday 19 August 2019, Shandon Historical Walking Tour; meet at North Gate Bridge, Shandon Street side, 6.45pm (free, two hours).

Tuesday 20 August 2019, The Victorian Quarter; meet on the Green at Audley Place, top of St Patrick’s Hill, 6.45pm (free, two hours)

Thursday 22 August 2019, The Lough and its Curiosities; meet at green area at northern green of The Lough, entrance of Lough Road to The Lough; 6.45pm (free, two hours)

Friday 23 August 2019, Douglas and its History, in association with Douglas Tidy Towns; meet in the carpark of Douglas Community Centre, 6.45pm (free, two hours).

Saturday 24 August 2019, Park Stories, explore the history of Cork’s Mardyke; meet at band stand in park, opposite Cork City Museum in Fitzgerald’s Park, 11am (free, two hours).

11 Aug 2019

January-July 2019 Back Issues of Our City, Our Town, Cork Independent

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The back issues of my Our City, our Town column in the Cork Independent, which explored the period from 1916 to 1918 are on the index of my website, www.corkheritage.ie and the articles from this column from the last ten years are now online and accessible to read. Before that many are published in book format and the titles of these books can be viewed on the website. In addition, I post extra articles and pictures on my heritage facebook page, Cork Our City, Our Town or check out my twitter page at @cllrkmac.

January to July 2019 editions:  http://corkheritage.ie/?page_id=4991

 

8 Aug 2019

Kieran’s Our City, Our Town, 8 August 2019

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1009a. Queen’s College Cork, by Robert Lowe Stopford, c.1850-1870

 

Kieran’s Our City, Our Town Article,

Cork Independent, 8 August 2019

Cork Heritage Open Day, Saturday 17 August 2019

 

   Cork Heritage Open Day and Heritage Week are looming – a kind of Christmas week – for a heritage fanatic like me. It is great to see the city’s local history and natural heritage being focussed on. Indeed as a city we need to celebrate it more publicly and more regularly.

   For one day only, nearly 40 buildings open their doors free of charge for this special event.  On Saturday 17 August, Members of the public are allowed a glimpse of some of Cork’s most fascinating buildings ranging from the medieval to the military, the civic to the commercial and the educational to the ecclesiastical. This event was greeted with great enthusiasm by building owners and members of the public alike in 2018 with an estimated c.24,000 people participating in the day.

   The event showcases the many elements of Cork City’s rich heritage in a fun, family friendly way. The event is organised by Cork City Council as part of Heritage Week in partnership with the Heritage Council. This event is organised almost entirely on a voluntary basis with building owners, local historians and communities giving their time free of charge. The success of the event lies with the people behind the buildings who open their doors willingly every year to allow the public a glimpse of the amazing and unique built heritage of Cork City. Without the generosity of the building owners, this event would not happen.

   It is always a great opportunity to explore behind some of Cork’s grandest buildings. With the past of a port city, Cork architecture is varied and much is hidden amongst the city’s narrow streets and laneways. Much of its architecture is also inspired by international styles – the British style of artwork pervading in most cases– but it’s always pays to look up in Cork and marvel at the Amsterdamesque-style of our eighteenth century structures on streets such as Oliver Plunkett Street or at the gorgeous tall spires of the city’s nineteenth-century churches.

   Cork Heritage Open Day(.ie) is fifteen years in the making and with 40 buildings it is almost impossible to visit them all in one day. It takes a few goes to get to them all and spend time appreciating their physical presence in our city but also the often-hidden context of why such buildings and their communities came together and their contribution to the modern day picture of the city. The team behind the Open Day do group the buildings into general themes, Steps and Steeples, Customs and Commerce, Medieval to Modern, Saints and Scholars and Life and Learning – one can walk the five trails to discover a number of buildings within these general themes. These themes remind the participant to remember how our city spreads from the marsh to the undulating hills surrounding it, how layered the city’s past is, how the city has been blessed to have many scholars contributing to its development and ambition in a variety of ways and how the way of life in Cork is intertwined with a strong sense of place.

   The trail Life and Learning is a very apt way to describe an important aspect of the city’s built architecture. The trail encompasses not only some of the amazing buildings on the western of the city, but also some of the most spectacular views. Admire the quadrangle of University College Cork, re-examine the Glucksman Gallery, gorge on the multitude of objects in Cork City Museum, and re-imagine life within the old Cork waterworks on the Lee Road.

   The origins of University College, Cork (UCC) dates to the early half of the 1800s. UCC was founded under the provisions made by Queen Victoria to endow new Colleges in Ireland for the advancement of learning in Ireland. Under the powers given by this act the three Colleges of Belfast, Cork and Galway were incorporated on the 30 December 1845. Architects, Bengamin Woodward and Sir Thomas Deane adopted a perpendicular Gothic style. The main buildings were arranged around three sides of a quadrangle, with the lecture rooms on the west while the towered entrance, examination hall – Aula Maxima, and library were located in the north-east range. The college opened on 7 November 1849.

  Sir Robert Kane became the first president of the college (1845-1873). His open-minded attitude took a stand against the traditionalist view that a university should be solely dedicated to the pursuit of liberal arts. He also had strong contacts with and beliefs in the importance of the social, industrial and economic life in the city.

  One of the buildings on the campus open on Heritage Open Day is the Crawford Observatory dates from 1880. The University attained the Observatory through the donations of several benefactors. One of them, William Crawford, contributed £1,000 towards its construction and the acquisition of astronomical instruments. William Crawford was also to donate to the buildings of Berkeley Hall, known as the Honan Hostel. He also gave a large sum towards the building of the entrance on Western Road. The Observatory houses an equatorial telescope, one for which Howard Grubb, who created it, obtained a Gold Medal at the Paris Exhibition of 1900. The Observatory also hosts a Ciderostatic telescope and Spectroscope.

See www.corkheritageopenday.ie for more details.

 

Kieran’s Upcoming Heritage Week Tours:

Saturday 17 August 2019 – Historical Walking Tour of Cork City Hall, 11am, ticketed (free, part of Cork Heritage Open Day; details at www.corkheritageopenday.ie)

Sunday 18 August 2019, Cork Through the Ages; meet at the National Monument, Grand Parade, 6.45pm (free, two hours).

Monday 19 August 2019, Shandon Historical Walking Tour; meet at North Gate Bridge, Shandon Street, 6.45pm (free, two hours).

Tuesday 20 August 2019, The Victorian Quarter; meet on the Green at Audley Place, top of St Patrick’s Hill, 6.45pm (free, two hours)

Thursday 22 August 2019, The Lough and its Curiosities; meet at green area at northern green of The Lough, entrance of Lough Road to The Lough; 6.45pm (free, two hours)

Friday 23 August 2019, Douglas and its History, in association with Douglas Tidy Towns; meet in the carpark of Douglas Community Centre, 6.45pm (free, two hours).

Saturday 24 August 2019, Park Stories, explore the history of Cork’s Mardyke; meet at band stand in park, opposite Cork City Museum in Fitzgerald’s Park, 11am (free, two hours).

Captions:

1009a. Queen’s College Cork, by Robert Lowe Stopford, c.1850-1870 (source: University College Cork)

1009b. Crawford Observatory, UCC, present day (picture: Kieran McCarthy)

 

1009b. Crawford Observatory, UCC, present day

5 Aug 2019

Kieran’s Facebook Page Link

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On Facebook? Check out the Cllr Kieran McCarthy page.

https://www.facebook.com/cllrkieranmccarthy/?view_public_for=271299990379625

3 Aug 2019

Lennox Robinson Award 100 Word Flash Fiction Award 2019

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LENNOX ROBINSON AWARD
FREE ENTRY TO 31 AUGUST
 
 
The closing date for the Cllr Kieran McCarthy Lennox Robinson 100 Word flash fiction Award 2019 has been extended to 31 August due to the interest from writers all over Ireland.
 
The award aims to remember the Douglas born playwright  and Abbey Theatre director Lennox Robinson who spent his formative years living in Ballymoney House near Ballineen in County Cork.
 
The 100 word short story has to be linked in some way to the work of Lennox Robinson who was one of  Ireland’s leading cultural figures.
 
The Award is open to writers both nationally and internationally. Submissions remain open until 31st August 2019 There is no entry fee and submissions, not more than 100 words must be emailed to douglaswriters1@gmail.com.
 
Ronnie McGinn, chairman of the Douglas Writers the event organisors said today that a short list will be published at the end of September.
 
The 100 euro prize will be presented to the winner by Cllr MacCarthy at a special event in the Douglas Library on Thursday 17th October 2019.