Category Archives: Cork City Events

Cllr McCarthy: Welcome Publication of Public Consultation Findings on The Marina Pedestrianisation

Press Release:

Independent Cllr Kieran McCarthy has welcomed the conclusion of the public consultation process on the permanent closure of the Marina from its junction with the northern entrance of Páirc Uí Chaoimh to its junction with Church Avenue, to vehicular traffic 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Cllr McCarthy noted: “The report arising from the consultation was discussed by local councillors at their local area committee meeting this week. Two hundred and fifty (250) submissions were received in relation to the proposed scheme. A total of 224 of the submissions expressed support for the proposal and in some cases suggested additional work or amendments to the proposal. A total of 21 of the submissions objected to the proposal. Overall, there was strong support for the proposal presented for the pedestrianisation of The Marina”.

The City Council propose to respond to a number of recurring items that were raised by the general public. The current proposed pedestrianisation on The Marina will be given effect initially by installing removable bollards on The Marina at its junction with the northern Páirc Uí Chaoimh entrance and with its junction with Church Avenue. A consultant has been appointed to look at the feasibility of providing fixtures of a more permanent nature such as automatic rising bollards at this location.

The current proposed pedestrianisation on The Marina will only provide access to the area for emergency vehicles and vehicles used for the purposes of the operation, maintenance, repair and improvement of services & infrastructure. A car park accommodating approximately 200 vehicles and disabled bays has been provided as part of the Marina Park development and is located at Centre Park Rd/ Marina junction running west towards Shandon Rowing Club

Requests to extend the scheme to the City Centre is outside the scope of this proposal, however, this may be considered as part of the development of the South Docklands area.

Public realm improvements such as the resurfacing, shared space, public lighting, seating, etc. are outside of the scope of this proposal, however funding is being sought to upgrade The Marina. Subject to the allocation of funding, a scheme will be designed and be brought forward for consideration to the public and local councillors.

The Marina, Cork, November 2020 (picture: Kieran McCarthy)
The Marina, Cork, November 2020 (picture: Kieran McCarthy)

Following assessment of the submissions received and the issues raised at the local area committee meeting, the report has now been referred for voting upon at the mid-December Council meeting of Cork City Council.

Cllr McCarthy: “Proposal for mixed-use development at iconic Cork building could ‘breathe new life into the area”

19 November 2020, “In the past year there are some really great examples of conversions of old buildings into tasteful apartments – such as on the South Terrace, George’s Quay, and Langford Row.  There is a very real need for accommodation within the city centre,” Cllr Kieran McCarthy said. Proposal for mixed-use development at iconic Cork building could ‘breathe new life into the area”. https://www.echolive.ie/corknews/Proposal-for-mixed-use-development-at-iconic-Cork-building-could-breathe-new-life-into-the-area-32d526d8-e01f-42dd-8056-51ba388d876a-ds?fbclid=IwAR1CNyW5uVLTIZx6buYXfZwKRTXp3QoE3YLrA43LvmglcPWNLzGMQbLdA2o

Kieran’s Comments, Cork City Council Budget Night, 16 November 2020

Thanks Lord Mayor,

There is a great depth across the activities of the various directorates of the Council. I think all our Directors bring a level of openness, listening and hard work ethic, which is warranted and very welcome in this challenging times.

Despite the cuts, there is still much work being pursued as well as many opportunities being mined.

COVID may have drawn us into a worrying time about finances but has clearly showed the resilience of this organisation.

The turning around of the various government financial stimuli by this organisation in very short time frames has been impressive. Certainly 12 months ago no one was predicting aspects such as the pedestrianisation of 17 streets and urban spaces and the strong ramping up of work on walking and cycling in our city.

We must not let that momentum on improving the urban fabric and environment slow down but keep pressure on, and keep the collaborations with traders and citizens effective and positive.

Perhaps the only certainly that goes with next year is that there will undoubtedly be further financial challenges– but it is important that we advance on preparing part 8s, whether it is for housing or roads, and keep sending such plans to either government or the NTA for approval respectively.

We have three 3 government cabinet Ministers from Cork – and I strongly think that we need a Microsoft Teams meeting with Minister McGrath in DPER to run over this Council’s ambitions in the short term.

What I learned recently from intervening with Minister Ryan on his Teams meeting with us is that we should not assume as a Council that all of the Cabinet are au fait with the Council’s work.

Where the meeting with Minister Ryan was very positive and very open, I was still not content to hear the narrative of bungling Cork in with Galway, Waterford and Limerick as just a mere regional city instead of the country’s second city.

I would like to see a meeting with Minister McGrath set up as soon as possible and that we liase with Minster Ryan early in the new year.

It is important opportunities are seized to realise the stepping stones on the way to achieving our ambitions.

Certainly, if you empower a local authority such as Cork City Council, it will deliver in spades.

Thanks.

Douglas Community Park, Early November 2020

Douglas Community Park, early November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)
Douglas Community Park, early November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)
Douglas Community Park, early November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

Douglas Community Park, early November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)
Douglas Community Park, early November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

Douglas Community Park, early November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)
Douglas Community Park, early November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

Douglas Community Park, early November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)
Douglas Community Park, early November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

Douglas Community Park, early November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

Douglas Community Park, early November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

Cllr McCarthy: Public Consultation on The Marina still Open, 27 October 2020

Independent Councillor Kieran McCarthy wishes to remind the public on the public consultation, which remains open till 2 November for proposals by Cork City Council to continue restricting vehicular access to The Marina. The proposal is to close the Marina to cars 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, from its junction with the northern entrance of Páirc Uí Chaoimh to its junction with Church Avenue.

Cllr McCarthy noted: “To open up public consultation on the pedestrianisation of The Marina is very welcome. Up to this year and for many years previously, the pedestrianisation process had been a goal of local councillors and many local residents, and in fairness to Roads officials and the Director of Operations they have responded to public calls”.

Cllr McCarthy continued: “During Covid-19 lockdowns, the pedestrianisation of the road as a temporary measure was the life-saver for many people who needed the outlet to walk and just take time-out during the 2km and 5km restrictions. I have had much correspondence by locals and other Corkonians calling for the continuance of the pedestrianisation beyond the phase 1 temporary measures. Many have emphasised to me the importance of this historic tree-lined avenue to public health and recreational use. However, I have also received correspondence from those who wish to tweak some of the parts of the pedestrianisation proposals. It is important that everyone gets their voice heard on the future of the Marina”.

Submissions on the proposal may be made via this online consultation portal, https://consult.corkcity.ie/. Alternatively, the documents will be made available for inspection by appointment at Reception Desk, Cork City Council, City Hall, Cork to Monday 2 November 2020 from 9am to 4.30pm. Please phone 021-4924000 in advance to arrange an appointment. Representations may be also be made in writing to “Senior Executive Engineer, Traffic Operations, Room 339, City Hall, Cork”. The closing date for receipt of submissions is on or before 5pm on Monday 2 November 2020.

Marina, Cork, October 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)
Marina, Cork, October 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

Remembering Terence MacSwiney, 25 October 2020

Terence MacSwiney, 1920 )picture: Cork City Library)
Terence MacSwiney, 1920 )picture: Cork City Library)

This week, Cork remembers the centenary of martyred Lord Mayor Terence MacSwiney. A colossus in Cork history Terence has attracted many historians, enthusiasts and champions to tell his story. His story is peppered with several aspects – amongst those that shine out are his love of his family, city, country, social bonds, language, comradeship, and hope – all mixed with pure tragedy.

In many ways, the end of his 74 day hunger strike changed the future public and collective memory narrative of Cork history forever. Each generation since his death has marked his contribution, reflected on its history, and have made sure that his memory will not be forgotten about and that his legacy will live on.

In our time, never before have ideas such as social bonds, family, comradeship and hope being so important as we journey through our challenging COVID times. There is much to learn from Cork 100 years ago and from some of the positive characteristics of society that imbued such a time.

One aspect, which is most welcome in 2020, is the continuous local history writing of new angles on the lives and experiences of those involved with the Independence struggle. The city is blessed with historians who spend each year retelling the story of the war but who also go out into communities and local schools, refreshing the stories amongst the older community and engaging the next generation.

Such latter scholars are also pushing for more scholarship on the time. There is still much work to be done in mining into Terence’s key works, his writings, perceptions and learning from his legacy. His book Principles of Freedom inspired many to rise up against British control in the late 1920s and 1930s. He was also a playwright, poet, founder of the Cork Dramatic Society with another of Cork’s famous literary sons Daniel Corkery. Terence wrote five plays with themes around revolution, democracy and freedom. Terence McSwiney was also a son, a husband, a father and a brother. The journey his relatives had to go through during his hunger strike also need to be explored more. The story of his sisters and their involvement in the local Cumann na mBan with the Cork Cumann’s story being told more and more, and this is most welcome.

Terence was also a proud Corkonian. His speech, when elected Lord Mayor on 30 March 1920, made reference to Cork’s place as one of Ireland’s first cities – indeed his call to work together for Cork’s advancement is one, which transcends every Corkonian generation and ever more important in the times we find ourselves in the at the moment; “Our spirit is but to be a more lively manifestation of the spirit in which we began the year to work for the city in a new zeal…to bring by our administration of the city glory to our allegiance, and by working for our city’s advancement with constancy in all honourable ways in her new dignity as one of the first cities of Ireland, to work for, and, if need be, to die for”.

I have been blogging about the centenary of the War of Independence in Cork in 1920 on my website at www.corkheritage.ie, which contains links to my newspaper articles and pictures. My work attempts to provide context to this pivotal year in Cork’s history. My blog pieces also explores Cork in 1920 and how the cityscape was rapidly becoming a war zone. Risky manoeuvres by the IRA created even riskier manoeuvres as ultimately the IRA took the war to the RIC and Black and Tans. Reading through local newspapers each day for 1920 shows the boiling frustration between all sides of the growing conflict. Tit-for-tat violence became common place.

Earlier this year I released a new book Witness to Murder, The Inquest of Tomás MacCurtain with John O’Mahony. The last time Tomás’s inquest in full was published was in the Cork Examiner between 23 March 1920 and 18 April 1920. Despite the ordeal and daily fallout from the interviews, over time the fourteen hearing sessions have not overly been revisited by scholars of the Irish War of Independence. The verdict has been highlighted on many occasions by many historians, but the information of the inquest has never been overly written about or the narratives within it explored.

What I have learned so far through my journey trying to understand the War of Independence in Cork is that the narrative is not black and white – it’s not a full on “them versus us” narrative  – but very nuanced with all those involved living in a small city, where everyone knew each other – where harsh decisions on life and death needed to be made.

The public commemoration of the centenary of Terence MacSwiney may be lessened due to COVID this year. But there is an onus on all those who have championed his story to reflect this week on his sacrifice and also on the men and women, who fought for Irish Independence one hundred years ago. Many put their lives on the line and many were killed for what they believed in. Each one of their stories is an important one. Terence and Tomás MacCurtain may be the duo who annually receive much attention in our city but I have seen through my engagement in local communities the many War of Independence medals in personal collections, which are treasured, and the many stories still waiting to be told. There is still much work to do to try to understand Cork and Ireland of 1920, which defined how Cork and indeed Ireland approaches its national history narrative in the present day and going into the future.

The voices of those who were on the frontline of the War of Independence must not be forgotten but learned from – they all add up to the sense of pride amongst its public have but also to the many complexities and nuances of the history of our southern capital, and what makes it lovingly tick – with all its positives and ongoing challenges.

Cllr Kieran McCarthy is a local historian and is an Independent member of Cork City Council. His heritage website is www.corkheritge.ie

Cllr McCarthy’s Blog Records War of Independence in Cork

Douglas Road Councillor Kieran McCarthy has been blogging about the centenary of the War of Independence in Cork in 1920. His website at www.corkheritage.ie contains links to his newspaper articles and pictures. Kieran’s work attempts to provide context to this pivotal moment in Cork’s history. The centenary of Terence MacSwiney’s death after his 74-day is fast approaching on 25 October and Terence also once lived at Eldred Terrace on Douglas Road with his wife Muriel. Kieran notes: “Terence is truly a colossus in Cork history who has attracted many historians, enthusiasts and champions to tell his story. His story is peppered with several aspects – amongst those that shine out are his love of his family, city, country, language comradeship, and hope – all mixed with pure tragedy. In many ways, the end of his 74 day hunger strike changed the future public and collective memory narrative of Cork history forever”.

Continuing Kieran details: “The blog pieces also explore Cork in 1920 and how the cityscape was rapidly becoming a war zone. Risky manoeuvres by the IRA created even riskier manoeuvres as ultimately the IRA took the war to the RIC and Black and Tans. Reading through local newspapers each day for 1920 shows the boiling frustration between all sides of the growing conflict. Tit-for-tat violence became common place”.

Earlier this Kieran released a new book Witness to Murder, The Inquest of Tomás MacCurtain with John O’Mahony. The last time Tomás’s inquest in full was published was in the Cork Examiner between 23 March 1920 and 18 April 1920. Despite the ordeal and daily fallout from the interviews, over time the fourteen hearing sessions have not overly been revisited by scholars of the Irish War of Independence. The verdict has been highlighted on many occasions by many historians, but the information of the inquest has never been overly written about or the narratives within it explored.

http://corkheritage.ie/?page_id=5202

Monkey Puzzle Tree Update, 17 October 2020

16 October 2020, “After the iconic Monkey Puzzle Tree in Mahon was blown down, Cork city councillor Kieran McCarthy, UCC’s Dr Eoin Lettice, O’Callaghan Properties and St Michael’s Credit Union joined together to ensure locals with fond memories of the tree could take part of it home”, Cork residents snap up pieces of iconic monkey puzzle tree, https://www.irishexaminer.com/news/munster/arid-40066755.html?fbclid=IwAR10JaNQzs_WdaOmwS8N3QKWSaERlqUQoxK70RBw4Ikqc1QIRDpl1aShjFI

Pictures, Autumnal Transitions, Marina, Cork, 11 October 2020

The Marina, Cork, 11 October 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

The Marina, Cork, 11 October 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

The Marina, Cork, 11 October 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

The Marina, Cork, 11 October 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

The Marina, Cork, 11 October 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

The Marina, Cork, 11 October 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

The Marina, Cork, 11 October 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

The Marina, Cork, 11 October 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

The Marina, Cork, 11 October 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

Cork Business in 1920, RTE Radio 1, 26 September 2020

Great to have a slot on The Business (show) on RTE Radio 1 yesterday speaking about the history of Cork in 1920 and the creation of the Irish International Trading Corporation (Cork).

“The future around Brexit remains unclear for Irish exporters. This week hauliers in the UK learned of potential two day delays at a de facto border in Kent. We could probably learn a thing or two from the 100 year old history of the Irish International Trading Corporation, based in Cork. Kieran McCarthy has been looking at their history”.

https://www.rte.ie/radio/radioplayer/html5/#/radio1/21840558


Letterhead of Irish International Trading Corporation , 1925