Category Archives: Cork History

Cllr McCarthy: Cork’s ‘Shaky Bridge’ set to reopen this weekend following €1.7m restoration

14 December 2020, “The Councillor and historian has long been a champion of the suspension pedestrian bridge, one of the last of its kind in operation in the country”,
Cork’s ‘Shakey Bridge’ set to reopen this weekend following €1.7m restoration,
Cork’s ‘Shakey Bridge’ set to reopen this weekend following €1.7m restoration – Cork Beo

Kieran’s Our City, Our Town, 10 December 2020

Aftermath of the Burning of Cork on St Patrick’s Street photograph by W Hogan (source: National Library of Ireland).

Aftermath of the Burning of Cork on St Patrick’s Street photograph by W Hogan (source: National Library of Ireland).

Kieran’s Our City, Our Town Article,

Cork Independent, 10 December 2020

Remembering 1920: The Burning of Cork

It was a night like no other in Cork’s War of Independence. The Cork Examiner records that about 7.30pm on Saturday night, 11 December 1920 auxiliary police were ambushed near Dillion’s Cross on the way to Cork Barracks. Bombs were thrown at the lorry and several of the occupants were injured, some badly. Reprisals began in the locality of the ambush, and during the night several houses in the district were burned. Buttimer’s Shop and Brian Dillion house were targeted. The latter House, which had a tablet on it dedicated to Irish Fenian Brian Dillion, was completely gutted. Rifle shots rang out and the crackling burning of timber was heard.

Between 8pm and 10pm volleys of revenge gunfire from auxiliary police and Black and Tans reverberated through the flat of the city and created considerable alarm as people stampeded away in various directions. Many people elected to stay in hotels and others sought the hospitable shelter of friend’s houses in the neighbourhood in which they happened at the time. The people sought their homes, extinguished all lights, and then passed through many hours of fear.

Passengers on the last tram to St Luke’s Cross, which left the Statue at 9pm had an eventful journey. The car had got about 60 to 70 yards beyond Empress Place Police Station on Summerhill North when a number of armed men in police uniform carrying carbines, and accompanied by auxiliaries, held it up. They ordered all the passengers off at the point with revolvers. Male passengers were ordered to line up for searching. Some tried to run and a voice rang out, “I’ll shoot anyone who runs”. Shots were fired in the air while the searches were being conducted.

The tram car was smashed up and was brought back by the conductor to the Fr Mathew Statue, who at that point was ordered off. It was set on fire and completely destroyed.

It was hoped that when curfew hour was reached there would be cessation of the firing and explosions, but such hopes were not realised: in fact as the night advanced the situation became more terrifying, and the people especially women and children were rendered helpless amidst fire and shots by Black and Tans stalking the streets with rifles and revolvers. About 10pm, following explosions, Messrs Grants’ Emporium, in St Patrick’s Street, was found to be ablaze.

The Superintendent of the City of Cork Fire Brigade, Alfred Hutson,received a call at 10.30pm to extinguish the fire at Grants. He found that the fire had gained considerable headway and the flames were coming through the roof. He got three lines of hose to work—one in Mutton Lane and two in Market Lane, intersecting passages on either side of these premises. With a good supply of water they were successful in confining the fire to Grant’s and prevented its spread to that portion running to the Grand Parade from Mutton Lane, while they saved, except with slight damage, the adjacent premises of Messrs Hackett (jeweller) and Haynes (jeweller).

The Market – a building mostly of timber – to the rear of Grants was found to be in great danger. Except for only a few minor outbreaks in the roof the fire brigade was successful in saving the Market and other valuable premises in Mutton Lane. The splendid building of Grant’s though with its stock was reduced to ruins.

During the fire-fighting at Grants Alfred Hutson received word from the Town Clerk that the Munster Arcade was on fire, just some doors from where he was. This was about 11.30pm. He sent some of his men and appliances available to contend with it. Shortly after he got word that the Cash’s premises were on fire. He shortened down hoses at Mutton Lane and sent all available stand-pipes, hoses and men to contend with this fire as well.

Hutson’s men found both the Munster Arcade and Cash’s well alight from end to end, with no prospect of saving either, and the fire spreading rapidly to adjoining properties. All the hydrants and mains that they could possibly use were brought to bear upon the flames and points were selected where the fire may be possibly checked and their efforts concentrated there.

The flames ranged with great intensity, and within an hour, buildings were reduced to ruins. Owing to the inflammatory nature of the materials in these premises, or as the result of petrol having been sprinkled within the buildings, the conflagrations became most fierce and the blocks of buildings running between St Patrick’s Street and Oliver Plunkett Street on one side and Cook Street and Merchant street on the other side became involved. It was impossible to subdue such outbreaks.

In the early hours of Sunday morning at 2.50am in the upper end of Dublin Hill in Blackpool the Black and Tans encroached on the houses of the Delaney family. IRA members Joseph Delaney, aged about 24, was shot dead and his brother, 30-year old Cornelius and his 50 year old uncle, William Dunlea, were wounded, the former very dangerously. All were shot at point blank range by uniformed soldiers. The two wounded men were removed to the Mercy Hospital where Cornelius succumbed to his wounds.

It was approaching 4am when it was discovered that the work of destruction continued. At that time the City Hall and Carnegie Library became ablaze. Both of these buildings were gutted, only the walls left standing. The upper portion of City Hall including the clock tower fell in. Such was the intensity of the fires the firemen were driven out of the buildings.

As dawn broke on Sunday morning, 12 December, residents of Cork were then able to see the picture of Saturday night’s work of devastation. Fine buildings, with highly valuable stock, had been wiped out, and thousands of people were to become unemployed.

In one twenty-four period, over four acres of Cork City’s Centre had been reduced to ruins – 2,000 people had lost their jobs, and an estimated three million pounds of damage had been inflicted on Cork’s City Centre building stock. Nearly one hundred businesses and homes had been destroyed or badly damaged by fire and looting.

Kieran’s latest book Witness to Murder, The Inquest of Tomás MacCurtain is now available to purchase online (co-authored with John O’Mahony 2020, Irish Examiner/www.examiner.ie).

Caption:

1078a. Aftermath of the Burning of Cork on St Patrick’s Street photograph by W Hogan (source: National Library of Ireland).

RTE Radio 1 Interview with Kieran on The Burning of Cork 1920, 5 December 1920

5 December 2020, “This week coming marks 100 years since the Burning of Cork. The Black and Tans destroyed homes, dozens of businesses and buildings. To take a look at this a bit more we’re joined by a local Cork historian Cllr Kieran McCarthy”, The Burning of Cork, 1920, The Business (rte.ie)

Title page from Who Burnt Cork City, 1921 (source: Cork City Library)
Title page from Who Burnt Cork City, 1921 (source: Cork City Library)

Kieran’s Our City, Our Town, 3 December 2020

1077a. Steamships at Penrose Quay, c.1910 (source: Cork City Through Time by Kieran McCarthy and Dan Breen).

Kieran’s Our City, Our Town Article,

Cork Independent, 3 December 2020

Remembering 1920: Arson, Ammo and Retaliation

In late November 1920, the fallout of events such as Bloody Sunday and the Kilmichael Ambush led to the further use of arson by Crown Forces as a common retaliation tool. Newspapers such as the Cork Examiner are full of accounts of arson against Sinn Féin clubs, Sinn Féin connected shops and random premises.

About 2am on 23 November 1920 the first of the Sinn Féin clubs were targeted. The fire brigade under Captain Hutson, Superintendent, was called to an outbreak at Watercourse Road. Proceeding there with firemen from Sullivan’s Quay, Grattan Street and Shandon Street Stations. They brigade found that the upper of 35 and 36 Watercourse Road was well alight. Much damage was done to the club premises, but the fire was got under control within half an hour. As the days progressed, Sinn Fein Clubs on Hardwick Street (24 November), Grand Parade (25 November), North Main Street (27 November) and were also targeted. In Dublin acting President of Sinn Féin was arrested by members of the auxiliary police force.

Michael Murphy was a Commandant of the 2nd Battalion of Cork IRA Brigade No.1. In his witness statement (WS1547) within the Bureau of Military History he recalls that on 25 November 1920, following a Volunteer meeting in the Sinn Féin Club within Thomas Ashe Hall on Fr Mathew Quay, five men of the 2nd Battalion were standing at the corner of Princes Street and St Patrick’s Street having a chat, when a Black and Tan in civilian dress came along and threw a grenade into the group. As a result, three lads were killed outright – Paddy Trahey, Vice-Commandant of the 2nd Battalion; N. Donohue, 2nd Battalion, and Volunteer Mehigan. Of the two others, Volunteer Sean Bawn Murphy had his arm shattered and Volunteer Reynolds had his thigh fractured.

In anticipation of an attempt being made by the enemy to burn the Thomas Ashe Hall, Michael and his company decided to prepare a surprise for the Black and Tans in the shape of a ‘trap’ mine inside the door of the Hall. The trap mine was laid for three days and nights before the Tans arrived and blew themselves up. It was necessary, therefore, to put a Volunteer guard on duty near the Hall. During the day to warn those of our men who might go into the Hall.

Michael obtained about three cwt. of gelignite and placed it immediately inside the Hall and against the outer wall. The gelignite was then well tamped with clay. Six electric detonators were fixed to the charge of gelignite and connected with electric wires attached to a switch at the inside of the front door; the switch was so arranged that it came into operation and fired the charge of gelignite when the front door was opened. They also loosened the ‘keeper’ of the lock on the front door, so as to make it easy to be broken, which, they anticipated, the Tans would do.

Shortly after midnight, on 30 November 1920, about twenty Black and Tans came to the Tomas Ashe Hall. Two of them hammered on the front door with the butts of their rifles while the remainder lined the wall just outside where the trap mine was laid. Eventually, the Tans burst in the door and a large explosion took place.

On 29 November 1920 the Transport Worker’s Union hall on Camden Quay was fire bombed. Cork City Hall was bombed and fired again on 30 November with much damage inflicted. Across the city centre, large shops became targets by Crown Forces. Messrs Dwyers on Washington Street (21 November), Forrest’s on St Patrick’s Street (27 November), Cahill and Co., American Shoe Co. and Blackthorn House on St Patrick’s Street (27 November) Egan’s St Patrick’s Street (30 November), O’Gorman’s and Dalton’s on MacCurtain Street (1 December), Confectionary Shop and Irish National Assurance Company on Marlboro Street (2 December).

Early in the month of December 1920, Michael Murphy was instructed by the Brigade Officer-in-Command to go to London to purchase arms. In London, the contact man was Mick O’Brien, a Cork Volunteer who was then representing his firm, Messrs. Dowdall O’Mahony & Co. in London. Mick had written to Seán Hegarty, the Brigade Officer in Command telling him that guns could be bought in London, and Hegarty sent Mick O’Brien a sum of money to purchase the guns. Mick O’Brien, however, would not do any buying requesting Hegarty go over to him. Hegarty sent Michael Murphy to London with £150 or so to meet Mick.

At this particular period, in order to build up a strong arms fund, the brigade ‘levied’ each company in the battalion to the extent of £150. This money was to be collected in each company area. When Michael arrived in London, he met Mick O’Brien by arrangement, and he brought him around to second hand gun shops where he inspected and bought a quantity of revolvers and ammunition. Michael purchased two Lewis guns and a good supply of ammunition. In all, when packed there were two filled barrels.

Before leaving Cork, Michael had got an touch with Sean Óg Murphy who was a clerk at the Cork Steampacket Company, and told him to expect a consignment addressed to Messrs. Swanton & Co., North Main St. Cork. This was a fictitious name; there was no such firm in Cork. On the arrival of the goods by boat in Cork, Sean Óg was to notify Michael and he would arrange to collect them.

When the two barrels of ammo came to Cork (Michael had returned to Cork by this time), they were taken out of the Cork Steampacket Company’s store for delivery to Swanton’s unknown to Sean Óg. When they were returned to the store, undelivered, somebody there opened the barrels, discovered their contents, and notified the police at Union Quay Barracks.

Somehow or other, Sean Óg got news of what was happening and immediately sent word to Michael. He went in haste to a haulage contractor who gave him a horse and car, and armed with a revolver, he proceeded to the Steampacket Company’s store. Producing the revolver, he ordered the barrel to be loaded on to the cart and made a hurried departure with my precious cargo. On his way back, he passed a party of detectives from Union Quay Barracks who were en route to Penrose Quay.

Kieran’s latest book Witness to Murder, The Inquest of Tomás MacCurtain is now available to purchase online (co-authored with John O’Mahony 2020, Irish Examiner/www.examiner.ie).

Captions:

1077a. Steamships at Penrose Quay, c.1910 (source: Cork City Through Time by Kieran McCarthy and Dan Breen).

Pictures, The Marina, Cork, 20 November 2020

The Marina, Cork, November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)
The Marina, Cork, November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)
The Marina, Cork, November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

The Marina, Cork, November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)
The Marina, Cork, November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

The Marina, Cork, November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)
The Marina, Cork, November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

The Marina, Cork, November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)
The Marina, Cork, November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

The Marina, Cork, November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)
The Marina, Cork, November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

The Marina, Cork, November 2020 (picture: Cllr Kieran McCarthy)

Kieran’s Our City, Our Town, 19 November 2020

1075a. Portrait of Patrick Hanley 1920 (source: Cork City Library).

1075a. Portrait of Patrick Hanley 1920 (source: Cork City Library).

Kieran’s Our City, Our Town Article,

Cork Independent, 19 November 2020

Remembering 1920: The Murder of Patrick Hanley

This week coincides with the centenary of teenager Patrick Hanley, who was shot by crown forces on 17 November 1920. George Hurley was a comrade of Patrick within Fianna Éireann or the youth division of Cork IRA Brigade No.1. He recalls the lead-up and incident in his witness statement to the Bureau of Military History (WS1630).

In 1919, the Fianna Éireann headquarters was moved to a private house on Cork’s Pope’s Quay, and, in 1920, to a house on North Main Street. This latter place served as headquarters up to the Truce of July 1921. The training programme of the Fianna consisted of drilling, signalling instruction and lectures in first-aid and in the use of the revolver and rifle. A rifle was used for instruction purposes. Frequent parades took place and on occasions the boys marched out into the country where field training was carried on. A distinctive uniform was worn consisting of a blue short pants, a green shirt with a saffron scarf, and a green broad-brimmed hat.

 The use of revolvers was discouraged by the senior organisation of the IRA in the city. A direction was given to the Fianna by headquarters in Cork that the Fianna Éireann was not to carry out any attacks on enemy forces by shooting, unless with the prior permission of the IRA.

The youth division pasted up posters concerning meetings, concerts and public parades. They helped in taking up collections of money for national purposes prisoners’ aid. funds, Sinn Féin election funds and such like. Enemy posters proclamations were torn down.

As time went on and the struggle became more intense in 1920, so also did Fianna Éireann activities increase. They carried out scouting duty and dispatches for the IRA and helped in the removal from suspected places of IRA ammunition and guns. They carried out daylight raids on shops and vans containing provisions and various other goods being dispatched to military barracks in Cork. On several occasions, they held up individual soldiers or Black and Tans and took their equipment.

The murder of Paddy Hanley was by way of a reprisal by the British for the shooting of an RIC sergeant named O’Donoghue by G Company of the IRA earlier on the same night of 17 November 1920 in the course of an IRA raid on Lunham’s bacon factory.

Patrick lived with his widowed mother at No. 2 Broad Street. He was the sole support of her and his sister. At about 11.45 p.m. on the night of 17 November 1920, the residents of No. 2 Broad Street were awakened by the noise of the front door being broken open; a man rushed up the stairs and entered the bedroom of Mr and Mrs Coleman who also resided in the house. The man was wearing a policeman’s uniform, cap and goggles. He came to the bedside with a revolver in one hand and a flash lamp in the other.

When asked by Mrs Coleman what brought him there, he merely exclaimed “Hello”, flashed his lamp on the bed, raised his revolver and fired point-blank into the bed. The bullet wounded Mr Coleman in the arm. The assailant then turned and walked out of the room leaving Mrs Coleman screaming.

Paddy Hanley opened the door of his room when he heard the man rushing up the stairs. The man in police uniform had just come from Mrs Coleman’s room. Whilst standing at the door of his bedroom door, Patrick was fired at. It missed him. The man fired a second time and the bullet struck Patrick above the heart, killing him instantly. He was in his night attire at the time.An ex-British army soldier who lived in Broad Lane was also shot dead.

Leo Buckley, Intelligence Officer with Cork Brigade No.1, was a witness of the shooting (WS1714, Bureau of Military History). At the time, he was sleeping in a top back room of an apartment house in Sheares Street. He recalls that some hours prior to Patrick’s death, an RIC Sergeant had been shot by Tommy Healy and Willie Joe O’Brien of G Company. Tommy and Willie were hiding on Sheares Street. Leo denotes in his witness statement that he felt that Patrick had been shot in mistake for Tommy Healy, while the shooting of O’Brien’s brother-in-law the ex-British army soldier was also a mistake.

In another reprisal raid the same night by the RIC in the Grattan Street, another Fianna boy O’Brien was shot in the mouth. He subsequently recovered from the wound. Volunteer Eugene O’Connell was also killed on the same evening as a reprisal for his part in the murder of the RIC Sergeant. An IRA man suspected of giving information as to who shot the RIC Sergeant was later apprehended and executed by the IRA.

Patrick Hanley’s remains were laid out in his Fianna Éireann uniform in the mortuary of the Mercy Hospital and later removed to the church of SS Peter & Paul. He was buried in St Finbarr’s Cemetery, the tricolour-draped coffin being shouldered all the way to the cemetery by the dead boy’s comrades.

At the Republican Plot there are two memorials to his memory – an individual cross and a marble stone to Fianna Éireann. In addition, on 17 November 1957, a plaque was unveiled by Lord Mayor Jago in memory of Patrick Hanley on Patrick Hanley Buildings on Grattan Street. Eugene O’Callaghan’s headstone can also be viewed in the Republican Plot.

Kieran’s latest book Witness to Murder, The Inquest of Tomás MacCurtain is now available to purchase online (co-authored with John O’Mahony 2020, Irish Examiner/www.examiner.ie).

Captions:

1075a. Portrait of Patrick Hanley 1920 (source: Cork City Library).

1075b. Gravestone of Patrick Hanley in the Republican Plot in St Finbarr’s Cemetery, present day (picture: Kieran McCarthy).

1075c. Remembrance plaque to Patrick Hanley on Grattan Street, Cork, erected in 1957 (picture: Kieran McCarthy).


1075b. Gravestone of Patrick Hanley in the Republican Plot in St Finbarr’s Cemetery, present day (picture: Kieran McCarthy).

1075c. Remembrance plaque to Patrick Hanley on Grattan Street, Cork, erected in 1957 (picture: Kieran McCarthy).

Cllr McCarthy: Marina Park Progressing, 17 November 2020

Press Release:

Independent Cllr Kieran McCarthy has welcomed progress on Marina Park. In response to Cllr McCarthy’s question on the floor of the most recent City Council meeting to the Chief Executive, he was informed that Phase 1 of the contract commenced in early March 2020 with a scheduled completion date of May 2021. Works were suspended on 30 March  due to the COVID – 19 lock-down in accordance with Government guidelines. Works resumed on site on 18 May following the lifting of restrictions for construction works. The contractor is making great progress on the works and is confident of achieving the scheduled completion date of May 2021.

Phase One, which covers the area from the Marquee Link Road (linking Monahan and Centre Park roads) to Páirc Uí Chaoimh, also incorporates new pathways, the installation of sunken lawn areas as well as the diversion of a watercourse.

The current works comprise the creation of a new public car park at the Shandon Boat Club end of the Marina, as well as a new cycle lane and pedestrian walkway (all completed), and the installation of a prominent red steel pavilion on the site of, and reproducing, the essence of the central hall of the former Munster Showgrounds.

Liam Casey, senior parks and landscape officer with the Council has noted in recent weeks that this structure will be roofed, but the sides will not be enclosed, and there will be opportunities for coffee pods and outdoor seating and arts and crafts.

Cllr McCarthy noted: “there is local excitement about the Marina Park development. It is now over seven years since the Part 8 document came before the City Council. The park was held up in the early days due to a lack of funding but has since received funded from an Urban EU funding pot. This is enough finances to develop phase one of the park, which is basically the foundations and greening of the former brownfields site of the former showgrounds”.

However, Cork City Council anticipates that it will go to tender later in November for the second phase of its bold Marina Park project which will ultimately see the formation of a contemporary city park, about five times the size of the famous FitzGerald’s Park. Phase 2, which concentrates on development to the east of Páirc Uí Chaoimh, takes in the Atlantic Pond and continues down as far as Blackrock Village.

Kieran’s Our City, Our Town, 12 November 2020

1074a. Lord Mayor of Cork Cllr Donal Óg O'Callaghan 1920 (picture: Cork City Museum)

1074a. Lord Mayor of Cork Cllr Donal Óg O’Callaghan 1920 (picture: Cork City Museum)

Kieran’s Our City, Our Town Article,

Cork Independent, 12 November 2020

Remembering 1920: Arise Lord Mayor O’Callaghan

On 4 November 1920, a large public crowd attended at City Hall’s Council Chamber. They were present to witness the special meeting of the Council of Cork Corporation, which was being held with the purpose of electing a successor to Lord Mayor Terence MacSwiney. Councillor Donal Óg O’Callaghan, who acted in his capacity of Deputy Lord Mayor since the arrest of Terence, was unanimously elected to the vacancy.

On the night of Donal’s election, with 34 members of the 56 councilors present due to the ongoing war of Independence, Alderman Professor Stockley was moved to the chair. Fr Dominic occupied a seat alongside the Mayoral chair. On the motion of Cllr Micheál O’Cuill seconded by Alderman Edmond Coughlan, both of whom spoke in Irish, Donal was unanimously elected to the position of Lord Mayor. Some months previously on 10 March 1920 Sinn Féin‘s Donal Óg O’Callaghan emerged as a victor in the first bye-election after the January 1920 local elections for Cork Corporation. Donal was a fluent Irish speaker and was the youngest representative to have ever held the high and important office. He also occupied the Chairmanship of the Cork County Council.

Donal, who was received with applause, then signed his declaration of office and was invested with the Mayoral chain. First speaking in Irish and afterwards in English the new Lord Mayor spoke about his predecessors and the ongoing war with the British Government, and the Republican position of not backing down in their aspirations for Independence; “Our position was that one after another two Republicans who held thechair had been murdered by the British government. That same murder gang, who called themselves a Government, while the remains of Terence MacSwiney still lay over the ground, and while it was still possible for that gang to heap insult on the remains did so, and even then the same gang spread forth its tentacle to seize the next man. However, my position was, and we are are setting it forth this night as clearly and distinctly and glaringly as it could  be possibly set forth, that we absolutely refuse to be tyrannised…our demand in the country has been made, and we are not going to flinch no matter what the result or cost might be”.

Following the Lord Mayor’s speech Alderman Tadgh Barry raised the execution of 18-year-old Kevin Barry from Dublin on 1 November 1920, who became the first Republican to be executed since 1916. Kevin Barry was an IRA section Commander who partook in various raids around Dublin city. On 20 September 1920, he participated in a raid where a street gun battle ensued, and three British soldiers were killed. Hiding under a tree Kevin was discovered and brought to Mountjoy Prison, where he refused to reveal the identity of his comrades. New legislation in 1920 had given military authorities greater powers to quell increasing IRA activity. Barry had privately admitted killing one soldier in an ambush and was tried as a soldier under the legislation. He was hanged for his crime. There was vast public outrage at the execution of a young man.

Alderman Tadgh Barry proposed a resolution: “That we the Corporation of Cork place on record our condemnation of the latest abominable crime, perpetrated by the British Government in Ireland in the murder, by hanging of young Kevin Barry, and offer our respectful sympathy to his patriot mother in her sorrow, and congratulations on her support of his refusal to purchase his life by betraying his comrades to his torturer?”. Tadgh’s motion was forwarded to the next meeting of the Council.

However, the deaths of young IRA volunteers continued. On 10 November 1920, 22-year-old Christy Lucey was killed at Túirín Dubh, Ballingeary, He took an active part in his local IRA company and on one evening he slept in the rough on a hillside. As descended the hillside the following morning, Christy was cornered by a group of Auxiliaries of C Company from Macroom and shot dead as he attempted to escape. The Auxiliary who shot him was himself soon executed by the IRA. When the Black and Tan individual returned to Macroom that evening, he entered the Market Bar and began to celebrate but was fatally shot.

Formerly a resident of Pembroke Street in Cork City, Christy was a former member of B Company of the First Battalion (Cork No. 1 Brigade) in Cork city. He was given an imposing funeral in the city and was buried in the Republican Plot in St Finbarr’s Cemetery. Such an event attracted much public interest including intimidating attention from British military forces in Cork city. As the funeral cortege commenced, an armoured car, in convoy with two lorries full of armed soldiers, arrived near the church. The officer in charge served a notice on Rev. J F Murphy, which denoted that only one hundred people would be allowed to take part in the cortege. As the cortege left the South Chapel and emerged into George’s Quay, an armoured car took up a position in the procession immediately before the carriages of the mourners. The coffin was draped in the republican colours and was carried on the shoulders of 4 Volunteers. On route to the cemetery, the paths along the route were filled with spectators.

A day after Christopher Lucey’s murder on 11 November 1920, Lord Mayor O’Callaghan and Father O’Leary, CC, of the South Chapel, received messages from Arthur Griffith, declaring that the Cork Hunger strike was to be ceased at Cork Gaol. To Griffith the prisoners had “sufficiently proved their devotion and fidelity, and that they should now, as they were prepared to die for Ireland, prepare again to live for her”. A small quantity of nourishment has been taken by the hunger strikers and it was hoped that they would recover.

A new book on Lord Mayor Donal Óg O’Callaghan’s life and times by UCC’s Dr Aodh Quinlivan and entitled Forgotten Lord Mayor, Donal Óg O’Callaghan, 1920-1924, will be published by Cork City Council this month.

Captions:

1074a. Lord Mayor of Cork Cllr Donal Óg O’Callaghan 1920 (picture: Cork City Museum).

1074b. Christopher Lucey as a Cork Fianna member in 1916 (picture: Cork City Library).

1074b. Christopher Lucey as a Cork Fianna member in 1916 (picture: Cork City Library).

1074b. Christopher Lucey as a Cork Fianna member in 1916 (picture: Cork City Library).

Plan for statues of revolutionary figures in Cork vetoed for not including any women, 10 November 2020

10 November 2020, “The motion was met with some resistance. Independent councillor Kieran McCarthy told the meeting he couldn’t support it. I just couldn’t support four male statues on Pana,” he said. I just think that the female context is completely forgotten from that time, the Cumann na mBan and all these other elements. There are busts of Mac Curtain, MacSwiney and Collins around the city, and there are places and streets named after them, he added”. Plan for statues of revolutionary figures in Cork vetoed for not including any women, https://www.irishexaminer.com/news/munster/arid-40079303.html

Ordinary Women in Extraordinary Times by Shandon Area History Group
Ordinary Women in Extraordinary Times by Shandon Area History Group